Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Not a Lottery Winner and Life Goes On…

Hub purchased a lottery ticket, only the second or third time he participated in lottery madness. I buy a ticket occasionally, when the spirit moves me. I might be wandering around my local lottery-selling store and have a couple of extra bucks on me, or the hype excites and I participate in the craziness, or I go in with family or friends or, in the past, co-workers.

NOT hub and me,
but apparently a lucky
South Carolina individual/couple/work group or ?
 Of course we did not win The Big One. The knowledge does not surprise or shock or in any way change my life. But in a positive way it altered my universe temporarily, deflecting attention from mid-term elections. 

It was fun, at least a tiny bit, to think about what I would do if we, hub and me, won the lottery, or at least a substantial chunk of cash. Hub insists he does not want to win because he wouldn’t know what to do with the money. It would be a burden, he states. I counter that he does not have to worry. I will take care of everything. And maybe spend a few bucks on an item or two or three he might want, although he contends he doesn’t want anything. 

I know buying a ticket is a useless activity, the chances of winning absurdly low, but $2 is cheap entertainment.

Folks believe receiving a large chunk of money, like winning the lottery or getting an unexpected inheritance, will change their life. For the better. But that is not always what happens. Money sometimes not only corrupts, but can screw up your life.

There are responsible winners, those who invest wisely, use the money to help family and favorite charities, do not blow it all in a short period of time.


Couples fight over their largesse and get divorced…make ill-advised investments and end up in debt…spend their way into poverty…squander their fortune on drugs…gamble their winnings away…become ensnared in tax evasion lawsuits…make disastrous personal and/or financial decisions and commit suicide…or get murdered…

My lifestyle will remain the same, whether or not I win the lottery. Hub and I watch our spending, although I admit if necessary we could tighten our money belt. I’ll throw out the Neiman-Marcus catalog should it appear in my mailbox, the luxuries beyond my budget. I will be sensible when buying a car (no sports car or luxury models), continue to choose restaurants within my budget, travel (budget accommodations), and shop sales for clothes and other non-essential necessities. 

So life goes on…